Inclusive heritage

Inclusive heritage

Young women in a wood
Young women taking part in the SHEROES natural heritage project. Credit: Wayfinding.
Heritage has a crucial role to play in contributing to a more equal society.

What is inclusion?

Inclusion is about taking action to ensure that contemporary society in the UK is better represented in your heritage project.

We believe everyone should be able to benefit from our funding, regardless of age, disability, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, faith, class or income.

"Heritage activities bring people and communities together in so many brilliant ways. We are constantly inspired by the many creative ways previously hidden histories are shared, helping us all learn more about each other and our differing personal lives, experiences and memories."

Liz Ellis, Heritage Fund Policy Project Manager for inclusion

The terms we use:

Some of the terms we use include:

  • diverse ethnic communities, or ethnically diverse communities. In Scotland we use MECC (minority ethnic and cultural community). We have revised our usage of the term BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic).
  • LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and other identities)

We use these terms because we believe they are widely understood. Identities can be complex and intersectional, and we are also aware that for many these terms may feel inadequate or limiting. We keep the language we use constantly under review.

What we expect from projects

Every project we fund must reach our mandatory outcome that "a wider range of people will be involved in heritage". Find out more in our inclusion guidance.

We want to see every project taking steps to reach out to new people, to share heritage beyond their organisation, and to embed inclusive practice as far as they can.

In planning your project, ensure that everyone you work with feels a sense of welcome and belonging.

Take a look below at some of the inspiring projects we have funded.

What you can expect from us

We want to make sure our funding is open and accessible to all. We have set out a plan to meet people’s access needs, from translation services to digital application support.

 

Heritage of diverse ethnic communities

Sikh men looking at a book

We support all sorts of projects which explore and celebrate the heritage of diverse ethnic communities.

We also want to help the sector itself to better reflect the UK population.

Children and young people

Group of young people

Over the past 25 years, we are proud to have invested over £60million across the UK in projects working with children and young people. This includes the £10m Kick the Dust programme.

Disability heritage

People using wheelchairs at heritage project

Disabled people are under-served in every area of the heritage sector, including people who are learning disabled, people with physical or sensory disabilities or those living with dementia or using mental health services.

We are working in partnership with disabled people to change this unfair situation.

LGBTQ+ heritage

Young people with rainbow bubble

Over the past 25 years we've invested over £5million across the UK in sharing stories of LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and other identities) heritage, creativity, activism and much more.

Pride march 1974
Pride march, 1974. Credit: Wikimedia

Stories

Saving LGBTQ+ stories before they are lost forever

A new Heritage Fund project might be the last chance to capture the experiences of LGBTQ+ people in Manchester who remember life before the Sexual Offences Act 1967.
Children and adults dancing and smiling
Pakiki Theatre group.

Projects

Exploring Newham’s Olympics heritage

Pakiki Theatre’s Who wants to be an Olympian? project will explore the sporting heritage of the Olympics and Paralympics with young people in Newham.

Person from Newham Music Trust performing
Credit: Newham Music Trust

Projects

The Olympics 2012 Legacy Songbook

Newham Music Trust will create a music programme to help Newham’s schools explore the positive impact London 2012 had on the area.

Two women at queer exhibition
Jasspreet Thethi and friend at Never Going Underground exhibition

Stories

LGBTQ+ projects that mean the most to us

We are proud to fund projects which celebrate LGBTQ+ history - here are a few of our staff members' favourites.
Outfits on display
Queer Looks exhibition at Brighton Museum. Credit: Tessa Hallmann

Projects

Wear it Out: the heritage of LGBTQ+ dress in Sussex, 1917-2017

This cultural heritage project explored how some people from LGBTQ+ communities have historically used clothing to express identity. It focused on Sussex in the time period 1917-2017.

Old photo showing large billboard with the words "AIDS: don't die of ignorance"
Don’t Die of Ignorance campaign billboard in Levenshulme, c.1986. Credit: Manchester Archives and Local Studies.

Projects

Pride! Prevention! Protection! Let’s Talk About Sex

LGBT Foundation recorded the memories of people involved in and affected by safer sex campaigns from the 1980s to the present day.