LGBTQ+ projects that mean the most to us

LGBTQ+ projects that mean the most to us

Two women at queer exhibition
Jasspreet Thethi and friend at Never Going Underground exhibition
We are proud to fund projects which celebrate LGBTQ+ history - here are a few of our staff members' favourites.

Never Going Underground, Manchester

Jasspreet Thethi, Engagement Manager, North

When walking into the Never Going Underground: The fight for LGBT+ Rights exhibition I was not prepared for the emotions that would follow.

Held at People’s History Museum in Manchester over two years, it was curated by members of the LGBTQ+ community. The exhibition celebrated decades of LGBTQ+ activism and honoured the struggles and joys of being part of the community, 50 years after the partial decriminalisation of homosexual acts in England and Wales.

"I cried tears of appreciation, thinking about the bravery of LGBTQ+ activists that had given me the rights and privileges I enjoy today."

For me, the exhibition triggered tears. I cried tears of appreciation, thinking about the bravery of LGBTQ+ activists that had given me the rights and privileges I enjoy today. And I cried tears of happiness seeing that they were celebrated and their history and work finally shared with the public.

Llandudno's Hidden History: LGBTQ+ Heritage Walk, Llandudno Museum and Gallery

Stephen Barlow, Head of Engagement, Wales

A group of actors in drag
Performers known as Roy Cowl's "Queeries" in Llandudno, 1930

Recently I was lucky enough to take part in Llandudno's Hidden History: LGBTQ+ Heritage Walk.

Despite working at the Heritage Fund, I didn’t know that volunteers, supported by museum staff, had worked hard to find out more about Llandudno’s LGBTQ+ history to create the walk. And if I’m really honest, apart from knowing about the odd gay night in Llandudno’s bars, I didn’t know that there was an LGBTQ+ history.

The walk was a real reminder of how historic buildings can help us to remember and share important stories that are sometimes difficult to hear.  

The tour starts right outside the museum doors, and tells the story of Llandudno’s place in LGBTQ+ people’s lives from the extravagant Henry Cyril Paget, fifth Marquess of Anglesey, right up to the creation of a local support group for trans people. As a result of creating the walk, the museum staff and volunteers spoke with local LGBTQ+ groups about how they wanted to see queer history represented in the future.

The walk was a real reminder of how historic buildings can help us to remember and share important stories that are sometimes difficult to hear.  

April Ashley: Portrait of a Lady, Museum of Liverpool

Élise Turner, Programme Support Officer

April Ashley
April Ashley at the opening of the exhibition. Credit: Ken Walker

For the first time someone struck up a conversation, sharing what the exhibition had meant to them.

Joining the Heritage Fund introduced me to early morning commutes where no one talks to each other. But the morning after visiting April Ashley: Portrait of a Lady I was reading the exhibition booklet on my journey, and for the first time someone struck up a conversation, sharing what the exhibition had meant to them.

What inspired me was that the exhibition, produced with arts & social justice organisation Homotopia, charted LGBTQ+ history right back to Roman times, showing that it has always been a part of our story. 

OUT in Furness, Drop Zone Youth Projects

Sydney Whiteside, Business Delivery Assistant, North

An incredible project we have supported is OUT in Furness by Drop Zone Youth Projects. Young people in Barrow-in-Furness put on an LGBTQ+ history exhibition, learning oral history recording, research and exhibition design skills at the same time.

It helped establish an annual Furness Pride event, now in its third year.

The incredible part was that this organisation had never worked specifically with LGBTQ+ young people before and there were few options for LGBTQ+ support in Barrow before this project.

It also helped establish an annual Furness Pride event, now in its third year.

As a member of the LGBTQ+ community, this project inspires me because it shows how a small initiative can have a tremendous impact not just for heritage, but for communities.

Want to run an LGBTQ+ project?

Find out more about all the amazing LGBTQ+ projects we have funded and take the next steps to starting your own.

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