Board decisions: March 2019

Summary minutes of the Board meeting held on 26 March 2019 at 9.00 a.m. at 7 Holbein Place, London, SW1W 8NR

Present:

  • Peter Luff (Chair)
  • Maria Adebowale-Schwarte
  • Kay Andrews
  • Anna Carragher
  • Claire Feehily
  • Sarah Flannigan
  • Perdita Hunt
  • Steve Miller
  • René Olivieri
  • Seona Reid
  • David Stocker
  • Tom Tew

Apologies:

  • Jim Dixon

Attending:

  • Darren Henley (item 27)
  • Ray Macfarlane
  • Victoria Bradford-Keegan (item 34)

Board Business

Welcomes

The Chair welcomed Ray Macfarlane to the Board meeting who was attending in an observational capacity. Ray had been appointed as Trustee for Scotland and would start her term on 1 April 2019.

He also highlighted that the Board would be joined after lunch by Darren Henley, Chief Executive of Arts Council England and who would give the Board a presentation on their work and priorities.

Victoria Bradford-Keegan, Director of the Future Parks Accelerator would also join the Board meeting to update the Trustees on their investment in the programme.

The Chair also noted that they had received apologies from Jim Dixon.

The Chair bade farewell well to:

  • Seona Reid, Deputy Chair of the NHMF Board, Trustee for Scotland and Committee for Scotland Chair. Seona had been on the Board for eight years, including a period as Interim Chair and would be dearly missed by all.
  • Karen Brookfield, Jon Williams, Joanna Finn and Jo Reilly, all of whom would be leaving the organisation at the end of the month. The Chair extended his thanks to each and for their years of service and dedication to the Fund and wished them the best in their future endeavours.

1. Minutes of the Board meeting on 26 February 2019

The minutes were agreed and signed as a true record of the meeting.

2. Matters arising from the minutes

There were none.

Seona Reid reported to the Board that at the Committee for Scotland they had received a knowledge briefing from Peter Middleton, Director of L&R Consulting, who had also worked as a mentor for many projects that had been supported by the Fund. She highlighted how useful the presentation had been in sharing lessons learned and suggested that a similar presentation might be of interest to the Board.

The Board wished to record their thanks to Sue Bowers and Anne Jenkins, who in their roles as Deputy Directors of Operations had had oversight of the 12 regional and country Committees for many years, steering meetings and providing guidance as necessary. The Board wished both the very best in their new roles within the organisation.

3. Declarations of Interest

The following declarations were noted:

The NHMF Chair reported that he was a past Chair of Worcester Cathedral Council and occasional worshipper at the Cathedral. Worcester Cathedral was the applicant for A Centre for Learning, Heritage, and Arts for the whole community (item 14). The Board agreed this did not constitute a conflict.

Anna Carragher reported a conflict for Heritage takes Centre Stage at Northern Ireland's Grand Opera House (item 25) as Former Chair of the Grand Opera House Trust and a Board member of the Arts Council of Northern Ireland who were a co-funder.

David Stocker reported a connection to

  • Ryevitalise (item 15). He held the honorary post of Visiting Professor of Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds and was on the Council of the National Trust, both organisations were involved in the partnership scheme; and
  • Cranborne Chase (item 12) – The Partnership team is currently chaired by National Trust. I am a member of the Council of the National Trust.

The Board noted that David had had no involvement with either application.

Steve Miller as Board Member of the National Museum Directors’ Council declared a range of affiliations with but no involvement with:

  • Acquisition of The Mervyn Peake Visual Archive, by the British Library (item 7);
  • the Acquisition of Nainsukh’s ‘The Trumpeters’  (item 8) from the British Museum; and
  • Black Country Living Museum (item 13).

Perdita Hunt, as Volunteer Special Advisor for the National Trust, Perdita reported a connection with those projects which involved the National Trust, Ryevitalise (item 15) and Cranborne Chase (item 12).

Tom Tew in his capacity as Trustee for the National Trust declared an interest for Ryevitalise (item 15) and Cranborne Chase (item 12). He had had no involvement in either project.

Jim Dixon had declared an interest in The People’s Hall Enterprise Hub (item 19) as a family member had involvement in the project.

David Renwick, new England, North Director had declared a conflict for Ryevitalise (item 15) as he had been involved in delivering the first round submission.

4. Chair’s Report

The Chair introduced the report and highlighted:

  • That he had met with the new Permanent Secretary for the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), Sarah Healey. The meeting had gone well and the Chair looked forward to future collaboration.
  • His attendance at a meeting comprising of the Chairs of the Lottery Distributors, the Secretary of State, the Arts Minister and Lottery Minister. This had been a very constructive meeting.

National Lottery Memorial Fund

5. NHMF Report

Fiona Talbott presented the report and highlighted:

  • That in the 1980s, Paxton House, in the Scottish Borders, had been a recipient of an NHMF-funded grant (Paxton Trust) and endowment (Thirlestane Castle Trust) to help improve facilities and long-term sustainability of the building.
  • Recently Paxton House had requested to draw down from the endowment to help with cash-flow issues, having to seek NHMF’s permission each time. Staff considered that the need to seek NHMF permission to utilise endowment capital restricted both trusts in their financial and operational management. Staff were reviewing the case and would bring a proposal for approval to the May Board meeting.

In advance of presenting the next update Perdita Hunt declared a conflict of interest and stepped out of the room during discussion.

  • Trustees should expect to receive a fast-track application from the Foundling Museum for the acquisition of William South's naval general service medal. The decision on this needed to be made quickly so the assessment would be shared with Trustees at the beginning of April for a decision by 8 April.

6. Minutes of the NHMF meeting on 4 February 2019

The Board noted the minutes.

7. CONFIDENTIAL

8. CONFIDENTIAL

National Lottery Heritage Fund

SF4 second round applications for discussion and decision

 9. Second Round Grants Overview Paper

The Board noted there were 16 second round cases (from SF4) valued at £44.8m for decision.

In advance of the meeting, having reviewed the detailed paper on each project, the Board had undertaken an electronic pre-vote to assist in identifying those applications which could be decided quickly as they clearly met the quality standard required, and those that would require a fuller consideration. Colin Bailey, Director of Finance and Corporate Services, presented the outcome of the pre-vote. Trustees were mindful of the competition for funding and noted that quality threshold would be a key consideration when discussing applications.

The Board agreed to award grants to the following high priority applications which were considered to meet the high quality threshold, without further discussion. These were:

  • Snakes in the Heather: helping Britain’s rarest reptile (item 11);
  • Cranborne Chase Landscape Partnership (item 12);
  • A Centre for Learning, Heritage, and Arts for the whole community (item 14);
  • Ryevitalise (item 15);
  • Leicester Cathedral Revealed (item 18);
  • The People’s Hall Enterprise Hub (item 19);
  • Hainault Ancient Forest (item 20);
  • Newcastle Cathedral: Common Ground in Sacred Space (item 21);
  • Back On Our Map (BOOM): South Cumbria Species Restoration Project (item 22);
  • Keep on Moving: the music and stories of Manchester’s migrant communities (item 23) and;
  • Heritage take Centre Stage at Northern Ireland’s Grand Opera House (item 25).

The Board would exceptionally always discuss major grants applications including those which had met the high quality threshold.

The Board also agreed to reject ‘Extending the Ampleforth Abbey Welcome’ (item 17), as it was considered that it did not meet the quality threshold, without further discussion due to the issues highlighted in the assessment and in light of budgetary pressure.

The Board agreed to discuss four applications prior to a decision being made. These were

  • Heritage at the Heart of Graylingwell (item 10)
  • Black Country Living Museum, Major grant application, (item 13)
  • Yorkshire’s Magnificent Journey (item 16)
  • The Heart of Ancient Ulster (item 24).

10. Heritage at the Heart of Graylingwell; HG-16-05889

Grantee: Chichester Community Development Trust

Request: Award grant of £1,300,900 (66%)

Project: To transform the Grade II listed Graylingwell Chapel into a multi-use heritage centre.  The Chapel was located within the Graylingwell Hospital Conservation Area in Chichester.  Capital works would include restoration works to the building’s historic fabric, new interpretation, meeting rooms and a café extension to create a multi-functional space for the community.  A programme of learning and participation opportunities would highlight the stories and experiences of the people who resided and worked at Graylingwell during its time as a psychiatric hospital.

The Committee for the South East of England had awarded a first round pass of £1,445,900 including a development grant of £142,900 (68% of total eligible development costs) in September 2017.

The Committee for the South East of England recommended the application to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £1,300,900 (66%)

11. Snakes in the Heather: helping Britain’s rarest reptile; HG-16-01612

Item not discussed.

Grantee: Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Trust

Request: Award grant of £412,000 (57%)

Project: To address the conservation needs of the Smooth Snake through habitat conservation, snake population surveys and raising public awareness of Britain’s most endangered snake through a range of engagement activities. Volunteers would be recruited to the project and trained to provide standardised monitoring across the Smooth Snake range and undertake accredited survey work. Technology would be used to facilitate the collection and dissemination of data.

The Board had awarded a first round pass of £467,100 including a development grant of £55,000 (72% of total eligible development costs) in March 2017.

The Committee for the South West had recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY (2 of 2) for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £412,000 (57%)

 12. Cranborne Chase Landscape Partnership; LP-16-00304

Item not discussed.

Grantee: Cranborne Chase and West Wiltshire Downs AONB

Request: Award Grant of £1,676,600 (63%)

Project: Three programmes of work, Natural Landscapes, Historic Landscapes and Cultural Landscapes, would be supported by a volunteer and youth programme. The landscape focuses on the traditional heart of the Cranborne Chase, the Medieval Royal hunting ground, the chalk river valley in the north of the area and the downland of the Chase.

The Board had awarded a first round pass of £1,782,000 including development grant of £105,400 (71% of total eligible development costs) in October 2016.

The Committee for the South West recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY (2 of 2) for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £1,676,600 (63%)

13. Black Country Living Museum: Forging Ahead - creating a world-class visitor attraction in the Black Country; HG-15-08369

Grantee: Black Country Living Museum

Request: Award grant of £9,400,000 (41%)

Project: To expand and significantly improve the visitor experience at the open air, Black Country Living Museum. The historic site would expand by one third in order to create a new historic development set in the 1940s-60s (with the translocation, recreation and replication of historic buildings at risk and double the amount of the Museum’s designated collection on display.  A new Visitor Centre would be built to improve the visitor offer.  The existing entrance building would be re-purposed as a dedicated Learning Centre and a new STEAM learning programme developed.

The Board had awarded a first round pass of £9,800,000 including a development grant of £400,000 (33% of total eligible development costs) in April 2017. 

The Committee for West Midlands recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY (1 of 2) for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £9,400,000 (41%)

 14. A Centre for Learning, Heritage, and Arts for the whole community; HG-16-04125

Item not discussed.

Grantee: Worcester Cathedral

Request: Award grant of £1,069,000 (52%)

Project:  To repair, conserve the Undercroft of Worcester Cathedral and convert this currently inaccessible storage space into a new learning centre for the community.  The Undercroft was a Grade I listed former monastic refectory cellar and a Scheduled Ancient Monument.  Capital works would also include the conservation of the internationally important 13th Century Christ in Majesty carving, located in the Cathedral’s College Hall.  A learning and participation programme aimed at widening engagement particularly with under-represented audiences would also be delivered.

The Board had awarded a first round pass of £1,237,000 including a development grant of £168,000 (66% of eligible development costs) in September 2017.

The Committee for West Midlands had recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY (2 of 2) for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £1,069,000 (52%)

 15. Ryevitalise; LP-15-07378

Item not discussed.

Grantee: North York Moors National Park Authority

Request: Award grant of £1,834,800 (54%)

Project: To conserve the natural heritage within the Rye catchment at Ryedale, North Yorkshire. There would be a series of projects to restore and reconnect the Rye’s habitats, work with landowners/managers to improve water quality and reconnect people with the landscape through projects and volunteering opportunities.

The Board had awarded a first round pass of £2,109,400 including a development grant of £274,600 (71% of total eligible development costs) in October 2016.

The Committee for Yorkshire and the Humber had recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY (1 of 2) for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £1,834,800 (54%)

16. Yorkshire’s Magnificent Journey:- equal access, wider engagement, greater sustainability for England’s most dramatic steam railway; HG-16-03834

Grantee: North Yorkshire Moors Historic Railway Trust Ltd

Request: Award grant of £4,436,400 (46%)

Project: To ensure the long-term sustainability of the world’s busiest heritage railway which crosses the challenging landscape of North York Moors from Pickering via Levisham, Newton Dale, Goathland and terminates at Grosmont. Alongside work to a number of bridges, a new carriage care housing and conservation facility would be created. An interpretation and learning project, a volunteer development programme and a lineside conservation programme would be delivered.

The Board awarded a first round pass of £4,609,400 including a development grant of £173,000 (47% of total eligible development costs) in June 2017.

The Committee for Yorkshire and the Humber recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY (2 of 2) for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £4,436,400 (46%) on the condition that the DEFRA funding was secured.

 17. Extending the Ampleforth Abbey Welcome; HG-16-01424

Item not discussed.

Grantee: Ampleforth Abbey and College

Request: Award grant of £2,738,600 (72%)

Project: To enhance the visitor experience at Ampleforth Abbey Estate, home to the largest Benedictine Monastic community in Britain. Repairs would be carried out to the Abbey Church, Monk’s Bridge and Walker Organ and the visitor centre extended. Site-wide interpretation, including digital and augmented reality would help tell the story of the estate from the community’s arrival in 1802 to life today.

The Board had awarded a first round pass of £2,963,200 including a development grant of £224,600 (75%) in November 2016.

Committee for Yorkshire and the Humber had recommended the project to the Board as a REJECTION. Issues highlighted by the Committee included; underdeveloped activity plans and a lack of strategic planning in regards to the future of the site.

The Board considered that due to the issues highlighted in the assessment and in light of budgetary pressure the project was REJECTED.

 18. Leicester Cathedral Revealed; HG-16-06400

Item not discussed.

Grantee: Leicester Cathedral

Request: Grant of £2,995,000 (27%)

Project: A programme of capital works for the Cathedral and its precinct to address repair needs, improving infrastructure and accessibility, providing a fitting final resting place for Richard III. The 1939 Old Song School would be demolished and replaced with a Heritage Learning Centre new build extension. An activities programme would also be developed.

The Board had awarded a first round pass of £3,325,000 including a development grant of £330,000 (48% of eligible development costs) in March 2017.

The Committee for the East Midlands had recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY (1 of 2) for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £2,995,000 (27%)

19.  The People’s Hall Enterprise Hub; HE-15-06147

Item not discussed.

Grantee: Nottingham City Council - Heritage and Urban Design

Request: Grant of £1,479,500 (46%)

Project: To bring back to use a Grade II* listed building, situated in the Lace Market Area of Nottingham, through providing a hub for new and emerging small businesses. The People’s Hall would be repaired and restored and spaces created for events, meetings and conferences. Café and retail facilities would also be created. Physical access would be improved through the installation of a lift and a series of heritage related activities would be delivered.

The Committee for the East Midlands had awarded a first round pass of £1,655,500 including a development grant of £153,800 (67% of eligible development costs) in June 2016.

The Committee for the East Midlands had recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY (2 of 2) for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £1,479,500 (46%))

 20. Hainault Ancient Forest; HG-16-04728

Item not discussed.

Grantee: London Borough of Redbridge

Request: Grant of £4,247,300 (68%)

Project: The restoration and enhancement of Hainault Ancient Forest, to include capital works to the SSSI, landscape and buildings. The delivery of a programme of activities around training, work-experience, skills, volunteering and learning. Activities aimed to create a centre of excellence for volunteering and work experience as pathways to employment. The farm offer would be refocused to connect it thematically to the SSSI and enhance the visitor experience.

The Board had awarded a first round pass of £4,466,400 including a development grant of £218,800 (73% of eligible development costs) in January 2017.

The Committee for London had recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £4,247,300 (68%)

21. Newcastle Cathedral: Common Ground in Sacred Space; HG-16-04672

Item not discussed.

Grantee: Newcastle Cathedral Trust

Request:  Award grant of £4,201,800 (70%)

Project: To protect and transform the Grade I listed building for current and future users, catalysing an organisational step-change focused on resilience and re-establishing St Nicholas’s Cathedral’s medieval role as a community hub in the heart of the city.  Capital works would conserve the building’s historic fabric and improve facilities and access for visitors and volunteers.  A targeted programme of learning and participation opportunities and events would engage wider audiences whilst a forward-looking access and engagement strategy aimed to open-up internal and external spaces for a wide range of uses. The school’s programme would be expanded and more than 30 placements from apprentices to postgraduates created.

The Board had awarded a first round pass of £4,559,700 including development grant of £357,900 (80% of total eligible development costs) in March 2017.

The Committee for the North East had recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £4,201,800 (70%)

 22. Back On Our Map (BOOM): South Cumbria Species Restoration Project; HG-14-07703

Item not discussed.

Grantee: University of Cumbria

Request: Grant of £1,056,400 (50%)

Project: Natural heritage restoration across the lowlands and low fells fringing Morecambe Bay in Cumbria, focusing on threatened flora and fauna, through a programme of species introductions and community engagement activities.

The Committee for the North West had awarded a first round pass of £1,265,200 including development grant of £174,500 (89% of total eligible development costs) in March 2017.

The Committee for North West had recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY (2 of 2) for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £1,056,400 (50%)

 23. Keep on Moving: the music and stories of Manchester’s migrant communities; HG-17-00394

Item not discussed.

Grantee: Inner City Music Ltd trading as Band on the Wall

Request: Grant of £1,400,000 (42%)

Project: To re-purpose the derelict Cocozza Wood building to increase and extend the offer of the adjacent Band on the Wall music and arts venue. The Victorian façade of the building would be retained and restored and the existing entrance and glass frontage of the Picturehouse would be adapted to increase external space and create a more prominent presence to the passing public. The education programme would be expanded to provide increased community engagement.

The Committee for the North West had awarded a first round pass of £1,437,000 including development grant of £37,000 (88% of total eligible development costs) in December 2017.

The Committee for North West had recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY (1 of 2) for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £1,400,000 (42%)

24. The Heart of Ancient Ulster; LP-16-00845

Grantee: Mid Ulster District Council

Request: Award grant of £2,002,300 (68%)

Project: To reconnect people to the existing rural peatland landscape and the former Neolithic archaeological of Mid Ulster, and deliver 24 projects aimed at addressing issues related to the built, natural and cultural heritage needs of this 441 km2 Landscape Partnership area.  The landscape had very low levels of light pollution and would provide an opportunity to create the first Dark Skies Reserve in Northern Ireland.  A training programme for 10 apprentices and outreach education and learning programmes in schools would also be delivered.

The Board awarded a first round pass of £2,087,399 including a development grant of £85,000 (74% of eligible development costs) in October 2016.

The Committee for Northern Ireland recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY (2 OF 2) for support.

The Board considered that due to the issues discussed and in light of budgetary pressure the project was REJECTED.

25. Heritage take Centre Stage at Northern Ireland’s Grand Opera House; HG-17-03472

Item not discussed.

Grantee: Grand Opera House Trust

Request: Award grant of £4,557,300 (39%)

Project: To restore the Grade A listed Grand Opera House in Central Belfast and upgrade its functionality with a permanent exhibition sharing the story of the building.  Capital works would include cleaning the ceiling decorations and paintings, restoring the architectural houselights and fittings and improvements to accessibility.  An outreach programme targeting new audiences would also be delivered.  The project would tie-in with the 125th anniversary of the building in December 2020.

The Board awarded a first round pass of £4,800,000 including a development grant of £242,700 (53% of eligible development costs) in December 2017.

The Committee for Northern Ireland recommended the project to the Board as a HIGH PRIORITY (1 OF 2) for support.

The Board AWARDED a grant of £4,557,300 (39%)

 26. Prioritisation of all second round items

As well as the cases awarded as a result of the pre-vote (detailed in item 9) the Board awarded grants to:

  • Heritage at the Heart of Graylingwell (item 10)
  • Black Country Living Museum: Forging Ahead - creating a world-class visitor attraction in the Black Country (item 13) and
  • Yorkshire’s Magnificent Journey:- equal access, wider engagement, greater sustainability for England’s most dramatic steam railway (item 16)

Following the case-by-case discussion the Board rejected The Heart of Ancient Ulster (item 24).

Corporate Items

 27. Darren Henley CEO, Arts Council England

The Chair welcomed Darren Henley, CEO Arts Council England (ACE) to the Board meeting. Ros Kerslake had recently attended an ACE Board meeting. Darren Henley shared the key priorities for ACE and also potential areas of collaboration between the distributors moving forward.

The Board noted the high level proposals set out within ACE’s 10-year strategy and the potential for areas of shared interest moving forward.

Cornwall Memorandum of Understanding: Ros Kerslake drew attention to the partnership approach which involved the signing of this document together with Arts Council England, Historic England and Cornwall Council and suggested this might become more frequent moving forward.

The Chair thanked Darren for delivering an enlightening presentation.

28. Chief Executive’s Report and Corporate Update

Ros Kerslake, Chief Executive, presented the update and drew attention to the following:

Major awards over £5m 2020-2021: Trustees discussed in outline the scope, positioning and handling for awards of £5m and above.

The Board noted the proposal for Expressions of Interest would be taken by a sub-committee of the Board. This would comprise Trustees and the Executive and possibly one or two external participants, although the panel composition would be agreed later. Trustees were keen to ensure that committees remained involved in the process together with the Country and Area Directors.

Adjustments had been made to the timetable to allow more time for the delivery of the major awards. Staff were currently considering the feasibility of whether to offer a financial reward to projects successful at EOI stage. Staff were also planning to hold a round-table discussion with stakeholders with a launch scheduled in late spring.  The full Board would take decisions on Development in December 2020 and Delivery round applications around two years later.

Trustees noted the proposals and suggested greater emphasis could be placed on place-making, well-being, and environmental impact, though noted that these are all part of our outcomes framework and standard requirements. They reinforced the need for applicants to take a strategic approach and the expectation that they would be required to meet outcomes strongly for this level of grant award. Trustees wanted assurance that less experienced applicants would not be disadvantaged by being invited to present their proposals to a decision making panel at EOI stage. Trustees also asked how we would take lessons learned from the major awards process and how this could inform future thinking, particularly for those unsuccessful projects at EOI stage.

The Board agreed the overall approach subject to their suggestions being acknowledged and further thought on the handling of applicants who might be invited to present to the Board.

Governance update: The Board noted that Staff had met with Farrer Solicitors recently to discuss legal and governance considerations with regard to the implementation of the Corporate Strategy and Tailored Review recommendations. Discussions had taken place with DCMS. The Financial Directions would need to be reviewed and submitted for approval.

Expression of Interests (EOI) of grants over £250,000: The Board noted the proposed approach for handling and also for review of the EOI process six months into the new financial year. Trustees requested that all EOIs should be reported to the Country and Area Committees.

Handling of Cross Territory applications

The Board noted the outlined approach for handling these applications. Trustees agreed this should be monitored moving forward.  Trustee suggested exploring how other funding organisations dealt with this type of funding portfolio.

Digital

Trustees were supportive of the focus on increased digital developments. The Board would receive an outline design and structure for this campaign at their May meeting. Trustees queried the timescales for taking digital work forward, in relation to both the website and to the campaigns and whether these were on target. The Fund had made commitment to supporting this initiative but might have to consider providing greater funding support in light of the need within the sector.

Locating our Business

The Edinburgh team had just been relocated to new offices.  All legal paperwork had been completed and exchanged for St Katherine’s Dock, with moves anticipated during the summer months.

Current Key Performance Indicators: Trustees noted these were set out in Appendix III and had been discussed and agreed by the Finance Staffing and Resources Committee.

29. Minutes of Finance, Staffing, and Resources Committee on 25 February 2019

René Olivieri, Chair for the Finance, Staffing and Resource Committee (FSRC), presented the minutes and drew attention to key areas of discussion at the Committee and their ongoing oversight of business, outside the meeting, during this busy period.

The Board noted the minutes and that the Committee had approved the change to delegations from 1 April 2019.

30. Corporate Risk Register

Colin Bailey, Director of Finance and Corporate Services presented the Corporate Risk Register.

The Board noted the Risk Appetite, at Appendix I. This was largely the same except for the creation of a new category relating to Innovation. The Board agreed the risk appetite for next year.

The Board considered the Corporate Risk Register and the assessment of the risk exposure. They noted that the external risk around National Lottery licence renewal. There was limited control over the Fund’s exposure to this risk but it would need close scrutiny.

31. Budget Paper 2019-20

Colin Bailey, presented the Budget Paper for 2019-20.

FSRC had reviewed the approach on all categories of budgets for next year and recommend that the Board approve these.

Administration Budgets: The Board agreed the budgets and requested detail of the provisional budgets for 2019/20 when available.

Business Transformation/Change Budgets: The Board noted that as SFF projects ended, there would be fewer budget areas. FSRC had approved all the business cases for the main work streams including contingency. The Board agreed the budgets.

Investment Budgets: The Board had agreed in October 2018 the overall SFF funding profile. The Board noted the updated provisional figures in the light of the changed income projections from £310m to £324m and the Board requirements for UK campaigns, loans and joint funds and the UK City of Culture. In addition, there was a contingency sum of £10m. The Country Reserve had been increased from £10M to £16M to address some of the Board’s previous comments. 

The Board agreed the investment budgets.

 32. Business Plan 2019-20

Colin Bailey introduced the item.

The Board noted the annual Business Plan which set out the corporate priorities for the next year and the work which would be undertaken to achieve these. The Plan also set out the wider information around the work planned by the Fund for 2019-20.

The Board agreed the Plan and noted proposals for publishing the Plan on the website in April/May.

33. Communications Branding Update

Carli, Harper-Penman, Director of Innovation and Insight introduced the update.

The Board discussed the branding and new name. The shortened version would be “The Fund” following its establishment as the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

Trustees noted the new brand concepts. They also noted the need for consistency and careful consideration before deploying any national variants of our visual identity.

The Board noted the proposals underway to celebrate the 25th anniversary on 19th November 2019.  There was a campaign plan in place and a major campaign with messaging was planned for the summer. The National Lottery Promotions Unit were in discussion with the BBC about landing of lottery awards. A key driver was greater recognition of the National Lottery and its achievements.

Items for presentation

34. Future Parks Accelerator

This item was moved up the agenda and presented after item 16.

The Chair welcomed Drew Bennellick, Head of Land and Nature, National Lottery Heritage Fund and Victoria Bradford- Keegan, Delivery Director, Future Parks Accelerator (FPA).

The FPA would be a step change in the way the Fund supports Parks, with entire green spaces of the town/district/city being funded rather than a single park.

Following the decision-making meeting that was held on 21 March 2019 (schedule of decisions for this meeting can be seen in Appendix I), out of the eleven applications that were received, eight received funding. The cohort would have two years to develop and deliver their project, with health and wellbeing being a key priority. Since its announcement the FPA had received a lot of support from government.

Due to local elections there was restricted period when funding decisions could not be announced. The FPA decisions would therefore be embargoed until the end of June.

The Chair thanked the FPA team for their update and excellent presentation.

Papers for information

35. Schedule of Delegated Decisions

The Board noted the schedule.

36. Any other business

Ros Kerslake reported that the Fund had been approached by Historic England to deliver the loans element of a joint initiative around the Northern Mills, if funding could be secured in the next spending review. The Board would be updated on any developments.

The next meeting will be held on 15 May 2019