Unsung: Celebrating the Bicentenary, Social Actions and legacy of Edward Rushton

A libation was held at the graveside of Edward Rushton
A libation was held at the graveside of Edward Rushton as part of a thanksgiving event Ollie Longhurst

Heritage Grants

Liverpool, North West
DaDa - Disability and Deaf Arts
£50300
A city-wide project celebrated the extraordinary life of activist Edward Rushton as part of DaDaFest International 2014.

Edward Rushton was Liverpool’s most implacable anti-slavery abolitionist, human rights activist and pioneer for disability rights. He is believed to have caught ophthalmia while working on a slave ship, aged 17, which left him blind. He lived and worked in Liverpool and established the Royal School for the Blind.

The project worked with volunteers, local schools and the Royal School for the Blind to explore Edward Rushton's story and issues around disability and slavery. Activities included visual arts and poetry workshops, an exhibition at the International Slavery Museum, a performance at the Bluecoat, an academic conference at the Museum of Liverpool and a thanksgiving service marking Disability History Month to remember Rushton’s work.

The project was produced by DaDaFest, a disability arts organisation based in Liverpool, which delivers DaDaFest International and other events to promote high-quality disability and deaf arts from unique cultural perspectives. It also produces opportunities for disabled and D/deaf people to access the arts, including training and a young people’s programme.

To find out more about the project and its achievements, visit the DaDaFest website.

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