Learning Together: making collections accessible through multi-sensory stories

Young girl interacting with a dragon puppet during a PAMIS story telling session

Heritage Grants

Scotland
PAMIS (Promoting a More Inclusive Society)
£56900
The stories behind exhibits at four of Scotland’s leading heritage attractions are being brought to life for people with profound and multiple learning disabilities.

For this project, PAMIS (Promoting A More Inclusive Society) is working with Kelvingrove Art Gallery in Glasgow, HMS Unicorn in Dundee, The Peter Pan Moat Brae Trust in Dumfries and the National Galleries of Scotland in Edinburgh. They aim to help open up their collections so that they can be enjoyed by children and adults with learning disabilities.

"Being able to access and engage with all that museums have to offer creates opportunities for meaningful activities and improves the quality of life for everyone.”

Storytelling is one of the oldest art forms in the world and multi-sensory storytelling opens the door to creativity and connection to heritage for people with profound and multiple learning disabilities. Using five of the senses, specially-scripted stories encouraging play and adventure are bringing selected museum exhibits to life.

PAMIS group story telling session
Group storytelling session

Maureen Phillip, Senior Family Support and Development Director at PAMIS said: “This project will open up communities for people with profound and multiple learning disabilities and those who care for them. Being able to access and engage with all that museums have to offer creates opportunities for meaningful activities and improves the quality of life for everyone.”

In light of COVID restrictions The Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art has three of the stories online and have included regular multi-sensory storying sessions as part of their family programme. The stories at the other venues will be available soon.

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